Tag Archives: Josh Goller

Volume 3, Issue 23

15 Feb

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Watch your fingers around Issue 3.23.

This snarling issue features Molotov Cocktail all-stars James Claffey and Paul de Denus along with phenom rookie Jeremy Hawkins. Probably best to read this issue while getting a series of preemptive rabies shots in your stomach.

Only one more issue left before we hit our three year anniversary and start of Volume 4, which we will be celebrating shortly thereafter with our anthology. Hit us up on facebook to keep informed about all our various comings and goings along with the usual viral facebook flotsam and jetsam.

Stay dark,
Josh Goller

The Connection

by Jeremy Hawkins

My Mother’s Hands

by James Claffey

Terrible

by Paul de Denus

Volume 3, Issue 22

1 Feb

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Well, I’m a human fly (it’s spelled F-L-Y). So check out Issue 3.22’s buzz buzz buzz, just because.

This issue features three first time contributors writing about low lives and high stakes (and perhaps some reborn maggots using germ warfare).

Our print anthology (Best of Vols. 1 & 2) has been on the back burner due to some technical issues and a death in the family, but we’re pushing onward again. The new release date will be April Fools’ Day, when you will at long last be able to hold the Molotov Cocktail in your hand.

And I say “buzzzzzzzz,”

Josh Goller
Editor

Clean

by Paul Heatley

Dead Meat

by Art Wright

Three Things

by Charles Rafferty

Volume 3, Issue 21

15 Jan

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Issue 3.21 tells you once, you son of a gun, its the best that’s ever been.

We’ve got a trio of first-timers this go-round, so dig into the dark and offbeat goodness, and submit your own flash fiction for next time. We might not be able to offer you a golden fiddle if you’re the best, but we still want you to bear your soul.

Stay dark,

Josh Goller
Editor

Alisha

by Sarena Ulibarri

It’s Like That Song

by T.L. Sherwood

The Last Cocktail

by James Ballard

Volume 3, Issue 10

1 Aug

Featuring work by writers from Hawaii, Massachusetts, and the United Kingdom, Issue 3.10 will stick with you.

Read about sultry angels of death, unmentionables concealed in unmentionable places, and cancer sticks jammed into a stoma. 

Then take a break, pour yourself a snifter of port, and get behind that keyboard and send us some of your own work. 

Josh Goller
Editor

Dream Girl

by Joseph Lewis V

Contraband

by Paul Beckman

A Pack of Rats

by Dan Powell

Volume 3, Issue 8

1 Jul

Issue 3.8 will club you over the head and harvest your pelt.

This go-round we feature authors from London, Canada, and Alabama, all of whom will knock your socks off.

Yes, we’re still in the process of informing those who will be included in the print anthology. Now quit whining and read some flash fiction, and then go shoot off some fireworks.

Stay dark,
Josh Goller

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Dr. X and Miss Y

by Thomas McColl

Ken and Barbie After the Divorce

by J.D. Hibbitts

Better Kind of Hate

by Beau Johnson

Volume 3, Issue 7

15 Jun

Issue 3.7 will have you reaching for the sky with work by returning contributor J. Bradley as well as first-timers Kayla Roseclere and Val Gryphin.

Still in the process of e-mailing past contributors from Volumes 1 & 2 for our upcoming print anthology. And in the fall, we plan to experiment with accepting submissions for original cover artwork (that fits with our aesthetic, of course). So if there are any artists/photographers among our minions, keep an eye out for more info.

Stay dark.

– Josh Goller

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Why I Don’t Drive

by J. Bradley

Kings

by Kayla Roseclere

Him

by Val Gryphin

Volume 3, Issue 2

1 Apr


Find what Issue 3.2 is hiding.

This issue features writers from Ecuador, Wales, and the United States. Within Issue 3.2 you will find stories about a makeshift funeral, a phantasmagorical transformation, and a castaway at sea.

As always, keep those submissions coming.

Stay dark,

Josh Goller
Editor
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It Will Be Much Nicer to Have It at Home

by Frances Hogg

The Chimera Factor

by L.S. Johnson

Cargo

by Emma Musty

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